Elaeocarpus Reticulatus "Prima Donna"

Elaeocarpus Reticulatus “Prima Donna”

A hardy small growing evergreen native tree. Makes an ideal specimen, screen or wind break.

In Spring/Summer the tree is a spectacular floral display, covered in masses of pink flowers resembling ballerina skirts.

Plant in a full sun to light shade position with well drained soil. Will tolerate a light frost once established.

A  versatile plant that is very pest and disease resistant and low maintenance, will grow 4- 6m in height in a garden situation.

Note – Many plants on our website are seasonal and may not be available all year round. Please contact your nearest store to check current availability

Please note: Many plants on our website are seasonal and may not be available all year round. Please contact your nearest store to check current availability

Plant Growing Tips

Where to Grow

The Elaeocarpus reticulatus, commonly known as the Blueberry Ash, thrives in a variety of climates ranging from cool southern areas to subtropical regions. It grows best in full sun to part shade and can be used as a feature tree, hedge, or screen due to its dense foliage and good response to pruning.

Temperature

Blueberry Ash is frost-resistant but performs better in frost-free areas. It can handle light frosts, making it suitable for various Australian climates from Queensland to Tasmania.

Humidity

This tree prefers a humid environment, especially during its growing season. Consistent moisture is crucial for optimal growth, although it becomes more drought-tolerant once established.

Soil Type

Elaeocarpus reticulatus flourishes in humus-rich, well-drained soil. It tolerates poorer soils but achieves the best growth in fertile, moist conditions. Ensure good drainage to prevent waterlogging.

Ross Evans Garden Centre footer logo
Runaway Bay Super Store
300 Oxley Drive, Coombabah QLD 4216
0488 010 656
Kenmore Super Store
2274 Moggill Rd, Kenmore QLD
0488 000 525
Morningside Super Store
451 Lytton Rd, Morningside QLD
0447 792 994
© Copyright – Ross Evans Garden Centre